Achtung:

Sie haben Javascript deaktiviert!
Sie haben versucht eine Funktion zu nutzen, die nur mit Javascript möglich ist. Um sämtliche Funktionalitäten unserer Internetseite zu nutzen, aktivieren Sie bitte Javascript in Ihrem Browser.

Lattice structure tensile specimen manufactured with laser melting (LM) process out of the material H13. Show image information
Partner of the DMRC Show image information
Partner of the DMRC Show image information
Quality control during a Laser Sinter (LS) build job by a researcher of the DMRC Show image information
Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) process during the manufacture of an Ultem 9085 part Show image information
Additive manufactured reaction wheel bracket for telecomunication satellites Show image information
Employees of the DMRC working with the "freeformer" from Arburg Show image information
Tactile measurement of a SLM part with a Coordinatemeasuring machine (CMM) Show image information
Powder particles are used as raw material for laser-based additive manufacturing Show image information

Lattice structure tensile specimen manufactured with laser melting (LM) process out of the material H13.

Partner of the DMRC

Partner of the DMRC

Quality control during a Laser Sinter (LS) build job by a researcher of the DMRC

Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) process during the manufacture of an Ultem 9085 part

Additive manufactured reaction wheel bracket for telecomunication satellites

Employees of the DMRC working with the "freeformer" from Arburg

Tactile measurement of a SLM part with a Coordinatemeasuring machine (CMM)

Powder particles are used as raw material for laser-based additive manufacturing

Additive Marking

Since its spin-off from the University of Paderborn in 2017, "Additive Marking" has been addressing the challenge of marking components manufactured additively to achieve a traceability over the entire product life cycle. The main goal is to link the digital process chain for example secured by blockchain technologies to the physical world. Efficient solutions to mark a high number of parts individually are currently not state of the art. This is where "Additive Marking" fills a gap in the digital process chain!

Applications range from spare parts and test specimens to safety-critical and highly complex products:

  • Spare parts that were previously produced by injection moulding or similar means and have been marked by the injection mould are increasingly being produced in 3-D printing as the demand is decreasing. A marking needs to be integrated in digital product data prior to the manufacturing process.
  • The specimens should be clearly assigned for positioning and orientation in the building chamber of an AM machine
  • Safety-critical components, for example in aerospace, medical applications or in automotive engineering, the necessity of marking for traceability is a matter of course.

Legally, many questions are currently aimed at the application of additive manufacturing processes.  Product and producer liability driven by the specific aspects of reproducibility of certain component and material properties are being discussed anew, so that a (still fictitious) headline of the future could read like this:

"New EU directive regulates obligations for the use of additive manufacturing processes: 3-D printed products must be labelled for traceability purposes."

With the support of "Additive Marking" you are prepared for the future!

Contact

Mail: info(at)additive-marking(dot)de

T: +49 5254 9344927

F: +49 5254 9570563

The University for the Information Society