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Lattice structure tensile specimen manufactured with laser melting (LM) process out of the material H13. Show image information
Industry partners of the DMRC. Show image information
Quality control during a Laser Sinter (LS) build job by a researcher of the DMRC. Show image information
Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) process during the manufacture of an Ultem 9085 part. Show image information
Additive manufactured reaction wheel bracket for telecomunication satellites. Show image information
Employees of the DMRC working with the "freeformer" from Arburg. Show image information
Tactile measurement of a SLM part with a Coordinatemeasuring machine (CMM). Show image information

Lattice structure tensile specimen manufactured with laser melting (LM) process out of the material H13.

Industry partners of the DMRC.

Quality control during a Laser Sinter (LS) build job by a researcher of the DMRC.

Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) process during the manufacture of an Ultem 9085 part.

Additive manufactured reaction wheel bracket for telecomunication satellites.

Employees of the DMRC working with the "freeformer" from Arburg.

Tactile measurement of a SLM part with a Coordinatemeasuring machine (CMM).

Light-weight construction: Robust simulation of complex loaded cellular structures

In order to reduce the energy consumption of moving parts as well as the total amount of the material used, diverse light-weight strategies are currently in the focus of industry and research. One promising approach is the application of additively manufactured cellular structures, which due to their low relative density are characterized by high relative strength. In contrast to other low-density materials, such as the well-known aluminum foams, the design of the cellular structures can be adapted to the outer load by local modification of the strut diameter or strut orientation. Consequently, a more efficient design can be achieved allowing for reducing the structural weight as well as the overall material use. Further advantages are seen in the relatively low building time (in comparison to bulk material) due to the low cross sectional area exposed by the laser, and in the applicability of cellular structures for improving the cooling capability of thermally loaded parts by designing the hollow spaces as channels for cooling media. For characterizing the fundamental behavior of cellular structures a first project was drafted with a focus on the occurring deformation mechanisms of metallic specimens under uniaxial and bending load. The results proved a good specific loading capacity but also a high influence of the cellular design on the resulting failure mechanisms. Likewise, the actual microstructural condition of the material turned out to be highly influential on the mechanical performance. A very high brittleness resulted in a different deformation pattern than a high ductility. A straightforward simulation of a simple cell geometry under uniaxial load showed a good accordance between the observed and simulated local deformations, but a simulation under bending load still proves difficult and the microstructural condition could not yet be taken into account. For industrial application a robust and reliable simulation is imperative, as the structural performance in dependence of both the cellular design and the microstructure have to be predictable under complex loading scenarios prevailing in many actual applications. Thus, the establishment of a robust FEA model for complex loaded cellular light-weight structures will be the aim of the present project. Based on the findings of a preliminary linearelastic simulation the examinations will be extended to linear-plastic deformation behavior including diverse material conditions by applying Ti-6Al-4V alloy (brittle) and 316L stainless steel (ductile). Furthermore, plastic cellular structures will be manufactured by Laser Sintering (LS) in order to verify the developed FEA model for a fundamentally different kind of material.

Further project information
Project statusIn progress
Project duration24 month
Funding50 % Land of North Rhine-Westphalia
50 % DMRC industry partner
Project managerProf. Dr.-Ing. habil. M. Schaper
Project coordinatorDr. Olaf Rehme (Siemens AG)
Scientific staffAlexander Taube
Peter Koppa
Wadim Reschetnik
Stefan Josupeit
Involved chairsMaterial Science (LWK)
Automotive Lightweight Construction (LiA)
Applied Mechanics (FAM)
Particle Technology (PVT)
Contact
Phone:
+49 5251 60-3855
Fax:
+49 5251 60-3854
Office:
E5.112

M.Sc. Alexander Taube

DMRC

Material Science

Alexander Taube
Phone:
+49 5251 60-5443
Fax:
+49 5251 60-3854
Office:
E5.118

Peter Koppa

DMRC

Selective Laser Melting / Innovative Materials

Peter Koppa
Phone:
+49 5251 60-5470
Office:
W2.101
Web:

Office hours:
Di. 13-17

M. Sc. Wadim Reschetnik

DMRC

Metal Laser Melting

Wadim Reschetnik
Phone:
+49 5251 60-5325
Fax:
+49 5251 60-5322
Office:
P1.3.22.2

Stefan Josupeit, M.Sc.

DMRC

Polymer Laser Sintering

Stefan Josupeit
Phone:
+49 5251 60-5410
Fax:
+49 5251 60-5409
Office:
W2.206
Web:

Office hours:

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