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Lattice structure tensile specimen manufactured with laser melting (LM) process out of the material H13. Show image information
Industry partners of the DMRC. Show image information
Quality control during a Laser Sinter (LS) build job by a researcher of the DMRC. Show image information
Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) process during the manufacture of an Ultem 9085 part. Show image information
Additive manufactured reaction wheel bracket for telecomunication satellites. Show image information
Employees of the DMRC working with the "freeformer" from Arburg. Show image information
Tactile measurement of a SLM part with a Coordinatemeasuring machine (CMM). Show image information

Lattice structure tensile specimen manufactured with laser melting (LM) process out of the material H13.

Industry partners of the DMRC.

Quality control during a Laser Sinter (LS) build job by a researcher of the DMRC.

Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) process during the manufacture of an Ultem 9085 part.

Additive manufactured reaction wheel bracket for telecomunication satellites.

Employees of the DMRC working with the "freeformer" from Arburg.

Tactile measurement of a SLM part with a Coordinatemeasuring machine (CMM).

Additive Manufactured Function Integrated Damping Structures

Mechanical vibrations occur in almost all industrial applications. These are periodically returning movements of technical systems or components. The vibration process is characterized by the state variables. One state variable, for example, is the position of a point in the vibrating system.

In technical systems mechanical vibrations are usually undesirable. They lead to increased stress on the components and thus to a reduction in lifetime. In addition, mechanical vibrations harm the function and lead to audible noise emission.

To mitigate these effects, the damping of mechanical vibrations is necessary. At the moment this is done by additional damping elements which are adapted to the vibrating components. A disadvantage of these elements proves to be the additional mass and the additional needed installation space. Further, a separate assembly step is required. This leads to higher manufacturing and assembly costs and increased weight. To minimize the manufacturing and assembly costs of technical systems, to adjust the damping functions to the corresponding mechanical vibrations and to reduce the weight, an integration of the damping function into existing structures of engineering system is desirable.

Additive manufacturing processes offer great design freedom. Complex structures can be manufactured without a significant increase of the manufacturing costs. The use of these manufacturing processes is constantly expanded through research and development. The advantages of the additive manufacturing process can be used in the field of vibration damping of mechanical vibrations.

They allow the direct integration of damping functions into structures of technical systems. For this purpose, an internal structure will be integrated into the components. Instead of solid structures cavities with different internal structures, for example lattice structures, will be integrated into the component. In addition, the damping effect will be affected by a variety of filling media in the cavities, such as residual particulate support material.

Functional integration of damping structures into existing compionents

Within the project it will be investigated, how damping functions can be integrated into existing structures by additive manufacturing processes. Further on it should be analyzed, how the damping function can be adjusted to different mechanical vibrations in order to obtain an optimum damping effect. Based on these empirical investigations, a simulation model is to be developed that enables the simulation of the experimental data.

Further project information
Project statusIn progress
Project duration 30 month
Funding50 % Land of North Rhine-Westphalia
50 % DMRC industry partner
Project managerProf. Dr.-Ing. Detmar Zimmer
Project coordinatorMartin Schäfer (Siemens AG)
Scientific staffThomas Künneke, M.Sc.
Involved chairsChair for design and drive technology (KAt)
Contact

Prof. Dr. Detmar Zimmer

Konstruktions- und Antriebstechnik

Detmar Zimmer
Phone:
+49 5251 60-2256
Fax:
+49 5251 60-3206
Office:
P1.3.17

M.Sc. Thomas Künneke

DMRC

Design technology (Design for function)

Thomas Künneke
Phone:
+49 5251 60-5420
Fax:
+49 5251 60-5409
Office:
W 2 103
Web:

Office hours:
Mi 14 - 15 Uhr

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